Adventures in Japan
Hey! I'm a prospective student of AIU, can you tell me a little bit about the uni from a personal perspective? Like what did you like most about the uni and what was the worst downside? What advice would you give incoming students?
Anonymous

I am so sorry for not being able to reply to this sooner. Unfortunately I can’t give you a proper response tonight, but I will be able to give you one this Friday around 9pm EST.

If you or anyone else has questions about the school, studying abroad, or Japan in general I can stick around and do an AMA. I’ve never done one before, but feel free to fill my inbox!

EDIT: Apparently my tumblr is so unpopular even I don’t show up for my own AMA. Will try again same time today :)

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A Visit to Japan’s Cat Island: Tashirojima (田代島)

For more photos and videos of Tashirojima’s cats, explore the 田代島 location page.

Off the Oshika Peninsula on the eastern shore of Japan sits Tashirojima (田代島), a small island that is home to about 100 people and hundreds of cats. “Cat Island,” as Tashiorjima is commonly called, was once home to a fishing industry and about 1,000 people, but the population has steadily declined and aged since its peak in the 1950s.

The island’s cats—believed to bring good fortune by locals—are Tashirojima’s biggest draw these days. Feline fanatics that are lucky enough to make the journey can also explore the island’s many cat shrines and cat-shaped stone monuments.

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The 2014 Sapporo Snow Festival Begins in Sapporo, Japan

To see more photos and videos of this year’s snow festival, explore the さっぽろ雪まつり SAPPORO SNOW FESTIVAL, 大通公園 (Odori Park), つどーむ and すすきの (Susukino) location pages.

The 65th Sapporo Snow Festival (さっぽろ雪まつり) began yesterday in the northern city of Sapporo, Japan. The week-long festival is one of the biggest winter events in the country, displaying hundreds of snow statues and ice sculptures in three venues across the city. Millions of visitors from around the world gather to marvel at the towering snow art and the elegantly shaped figures made of ice.

The Japan Self-Defense Forces, local construction companies, guest teams from abroad and local volunteers spend up to one month completing their projects. In addition to featuring trends and icons from the previous year, this year’s snow sculptures also showcase famous architectural structures such as the tomb of Itimad-ud-Daula in India and Malaysia’s Sultan Abdul Samad building.

One of the few things on my bucket list.

dampsandwich:

mom i dont wanna go to school i dont feel good


I had originally given up on trying to keep this going, but this was too good not to re-blog.

dampsandwich:

mom i dont wanna go to school i dont feel good

I had originally given up on trying to keep this going, but this was too good not to re-blog.

ONE-chan, as you may know, is the mascot for AIU. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, I wasn’t able to get the source files for this loveable mascot, so I had to draw one myself based on a google image search result. He was a rush job, but I don’t think he turned out half bad. Only 32 more hours until the UNI International Opportunities Fair. Fighting!

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Exploring Kyoto’s Amanohashidate Sandbar (天橋立)

For more photos from Amanohashidate and the Buddhist temple, check out the Amanohashidate (天橋立) and Chion-ji (智恩寺) location pages.

In the 17th century, Japanese scholar Hayashi Gahō is said to have declared the three most scenic views of Japan (日本三景): the islands of Matsushima, Hiroshima prefecture’s Itsukushima Shrine and, finally, the Amanohashidate sandbar in Kyoto.

With lush pine forests extending down to the expansive shoreline, Amanohashidate stretches nearly two miles across Miyazu Bay. Though most popularly viewed from the mountains on either side of the bay, the land bridge itself contains a small theme park and the Chion-ji Buddhist temple. The contrasts between forests and beaches have drawn local and visiting Instagrammers alike to stroll among the sandbar’s pine trees and document Amanohashidate’s beauty.

No more photos this week as I am too busy preparing for UNI’s International Opportunities Fair. AIU is a fairly new program, so a friend and I are making the display board from scratch.

If you are a UNI student, come to the fair! That way, my efforts will not be in vain and you will get to see some incredible opportunities as well.

No more photos this week as I am too busy preparing for UNI’s International Opportunities Fair. AIU is a fairly new program, so a friend and I are making the display board from scratch.

If you are a UNI student, come to the fair! That way, my efforts will not be in vain and you will get to see some incredible opportunities as well.

AIU Matriculation Ceremony 2012

Photography by Julian Tirazona


While students in America were celebrating Labor Day last Monday, it was the first day of classes for students across Japan. Before classes start, it is traditional in Japan to hold an Opening or “Matriculation” Ceremony ― welcoming students to their new place of study. There you will see many of the university faculty and have some guest speakers give a dialogue. Since uniforms are no longer a requirement at the university level, attendees are expected to arrive in semi-formal attire (black suit with conservative black tie is best.)

That said, おめでとう (congratulations) to AIU’s newest students, and to students all over to globe for finishing their first week(s) of classes!

AIU Matriculation Ceremony 2012

Photography by Julian Tirazona


While students in America were celebrating Labor Day last Monday, it was the first day of classes for students across Japan. Before classes start, it is traditional in Japan to hold an Opening or “Matriculation” Ceremony ― welcoming students to their new place of study. There you will see many of the university faculty and have some guest speakers give a dialogue. Since uniforms are no longer a requirement at the university level, attendees are expected to arrive in semi-formal attire (black suit with conservative black tie is best.)

That said, おめでとう (congratulations) to AIU’s newest students, and to students all over to globe for finishing their first week(s) of classes!

Believe it or not, less than ten panthers have taken advantage of this amazing opportunity. If you have an interest in learning the Japanese language and culture, I highly recommend you go to the UNI Study Abroad Center today and ask about Akita’s summer or semester programs!

Photography by Greg Stoll

For more details, refer to the sites listed below.
http://studyabroad.uni.edu
http://www.aiu.ac.jp/international/en/

Pictured above is the late Dr. Mineo Nakajima greeting a fresh batch of new international students.

Photography by AIU

When you go the full-exchange route you be facing a completely different experience entirely. Whereas the Summer Program follows a strict schedule, when you enroll at Akita International University as an exchange student you are given a lot more freedoms in regards to living arrangements, what classes you take, and the ability to join university clubs and organizations.

Classes are taught in English, and range everywhere from your standard economics class to the unorthodox like Dr. Darren Ashmore’s “Manga Mania” surveying Japanese animation from its roots to modern time.

Pictured above is the late Dr. Mineo Nakajima greeting a fresh batch of new international students.

Photography by AIU

When you go the full-exchange route you be facing a completely different experience entirely. Whereas the Summer Program follows a strict schedule, when you enroll at Akita International University as an exchange student you are given a lot more freedoms in regards to living arrangements, what classes you take, and the ability to join university clubs and organizations.

Classes are taught in English, and range everywhere from your standard economics class to the unorthodox like Dr. Darren Ashmore’s “Manga Mania” surveying Japanese animation from its roots to modern time.